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Visual Merchandising

By: Richard Winig

Puzzling, you have a beautiful optical with frames and merchandise for sale, customers are coming in, but your inventory isn’t flying off the shelf. What could potentially be the problem? Maybe it’s your visual merchandising or lack thereof.


Visual merchandising is the use of sight to entice your customer base. This is done by using attractive displays, arrangements, demonstrations, informative signage and packaging to get your products noticed. Knowing where to place items within each arrangement, proper placement within the re- tail environment and the overall impression of your space all contribute to visual merchandising. It’s just as important to present your products properly as it is to have the right products to begin with.


Proper merchandising educates customers, tells a story, drives emotions and leads to an overall better patient experience. A properly merchandised retail environment can in- crease sales and lead to more repeat business. Without proper merchandising your retail space can be hard to navigate, which can ultimately lead to a decrease in sales. Products become lost, boring or unimportant. A bland and confusing selling environment does not excite a customer about your product and can negatively affect their shopping experience.
Merchandise simply laid out on a table or placed on shelves does not imply any sort of worth or attract attention. You need to identify the respective categories (men, women, suns, etc.), brands and product features in order to create an engaging customer experience.


Attract customers with branding, signage and lifestyle props. Showcase frames in multiple ways utilizing shelving, rotating frame holders and a well balanced, symmetrical retail space. Decorative displays, products, arrangements and environments suggest worth, variety and individuality. This generates a desire to obtain the product or service, therefore increasing your bottom line. It is key to have a plan for your products within your space and to use displays that are designed and engineered with your very specific product in mind.


Take a closer look at your product presentation. Is it cluttered? Is there a brand identity present for your products? Is the retail environment stressful for patients? Objectively looking at your displays or asking trusted peers for input on this may be very beneficial. Adjusting or simply refreshing your merchandising can often have surprising and rewarding results.


Visual Merchandising Facts:
83% of human information is obtained through sense of sight.
A patient will determine product interest in 3-8 seconds based on first impressions.
Visual merchandising immediately communicates information and sends a message to your patient.
Visual merchandising motivates the patient to make a purchase both planned an unplanned.
Visual merchandising attracts attention and elevates the perceived value of products by enhancing the shopping experience.

For more information contact the author:
Richard Winig, President, Senior Designer, Eye Designs LLC
www.eyedesigns, com
800-346-8890

About the Author

Richard is the President and Senior Designer at Eye Designs, Inc. He has over 25 years experience designing successful optical environments and has been a featured speaker at many industry events.

View all articles by Richard Winig


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All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.

All financing is subject to credit approval.